GPU rendering with Cycles Renderer

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Rendering is a time-consuming task as the system has to compute geometry, shading, environment, ray-tracing and other information and running this process on a CPU can take a lot of time.

GPU rendering can save a lot of time as it can compute 2D/3D much more efficiently, stay tuned to know how.

This is one of those features that makes Blender so nice to work with.

How fast is it? Why? How?

GPU’s have components that are designed for tasks like rendering, baking real-time-rendering(gaming), which makes them better at this process as a result taking lesser time than a CPU, but it is not compulsory that it will be faster than CPU because it depends on the type of the GPU sometimes they can be faster other times it can be slower

Blender currently has CUDA based Graphics Card and has just introduced initial support for OpenCL-based AMD Graphics Cards. The performance aspect completely depends on your hardware specification.

Settings for GPU Compile

GPU rendering in Cycles renderer is known as GPU compile to enable this option we need to change certain user preferences (the availability of these option depends on your hardware specification).

Go to File > User Preferences

Blender File menu hovering on user preferences

Switch to System tab.

GPU rendering with Cycles Renderer Image 1

In the bottom left you will find Compute Device:

Blender Compute Device

As you can see in the above screenshot there are two tabs available, this means Cycles renderer supports the GPU with OpenCL(AMD graphics Card) If you are using Nvidia  graphics Card the second tab would be CUDA if the graphics card is supported.

Switch to the second tab and click the drop down menu you will find a list of Graphics Card.

![blender-cd-opencl](https://revryl.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/blender-cd-opencl.png)
MacBook Pro 15 (Mid-2015) with AMD Radeon R9 M370x

Once you Compute Device has been set correctly you should find the Render panel offering **Device: **(shown is the screenshot below)

blender-render-device

blender-gpu-compile

Hit Render, In the first GPU rendering, it will run prepare the rendering kernel which might take some time.

Thank you for reading,

Keep on rendering

Encrypto – File/Folder encryption app

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Encrypto Home Screen

Encrpyto is a free lightweight and minimal design AES-256 file/folder encryption app for Mac and Windows developed by MacPaw, the same people who created  Hider 2.

It is very easy to use and it also reduces the file-size after encrypting with the help of built-in compression it also comes with a share menu.

IEncrypto Share Menu

This is one of those apps, I would recommend personally.

Thank you for reading,

If you have a question or thought leave a comment below.

How to install Blender on Mac

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Blender is a  free production ready open-source 2D/3D Animation software package that is used by studios and individuals to create stunning artwork, animated films, models, packshots, VFX, 3D printing and video game development.

It is also one of the few software that offers GPU rendering (Cycles Renderer). Currently, it only supports CUDA GPU and has initial support for AMD so the render time may vary depending on the Graphics Card itself or the software may only support CPU rendering depending on the hardware support.

We can download Blender from here. The installation process is dead simple.

Unzip the archive and now we are good to go with moving the only two files we need to the Applications folder.

  1. Blender
  2. Blender Player

The moment we start Blender we are greeted with a beautiful splash screen.

![Blender 2.77 splash screen](https://revryl.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Startup_Blender_2.77a_screenshot-1024×602.jpg)
Default Blender interface

We can now start using Blender and build up 2D/3D content.

Thank you for reading,

If you have any questions leave a comment below.